REVIEW - SmallChickBigDeals.com: Classic French Cuisine on the #UES @SelEtPoivreNYC
If you find yourself on the Upper East Side craving French fare, look no further than Sel et Poivre. Owner/Chef Christian Schienle prepares classic French bistro dishes with a refined, updated flair...

REVIEW - DishelinGuide.com: Sel et Poivre
This June, Sel et Poivre will mark it’s 25th anniversary. It certainly doesn’t feel old, but it does represent something that’s become much more of an anomaly since it first opened it’s doors. It’s a traditional French bistro with a warmth that make you feel as if you eating a friend’s house in the countryside. The entrance looks like something straight out of Paris with chestnut panels and large windows that open onto the street in warmer months. In the dining area, you’ll find walls adorned with dark wooden beams, antique sconces and black & white photos from family trips to Europe. There’s no funky lighting or music playing, just the sound of conversation. Classic and classy...

REVIEW - JohnnyPrimeSteaks.com: Sel et Poivre
This year Christian and Pamela are celebrating their 25th anniversary so be ready for some special menus coming this spring/summer season. The atmosphere is very local and homey. Walls are adorned with old black and white photos of family travels. There’s a classic, clean French bistro feel to the place, and the 65-person seating capability is intimate without being stuffy or crowded. So how’s the service? Amazing...


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AUDIO REVIEW - CBS: Sel Et Poivre Celebrates 25th Anniversary


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REVIEW - The Walman Report: Sel et Poivre Revisited
In our quest to review the newest and most trendy restaurant openings, let’s not forget New York’s heritage of charming family-run establishments. Whether they be American, ethnic or a charming French bistro such as Sel et Poivre (Above), they are worth revisiting, remembering and add focus to a constantly changing restaurant scene, where the venue or clientele is often the main feature...

MAGAZINE REVIEW - Raine Magazine: Answering One's Foodie Desires
The busy entrepreneur longs to savor a well-deserved meal at the end of a hectic day. We have rushed from one meeting to the next, answered more calls than a few and sometimes settled for subpar dining at unenviable places. Our lives are on the go! Every once in a while we scour the city for the perfect spot for a business breakfast, lunch or dinner. Mostly, we just long for the reliable gems, establishments that will serve the right treat when we want to celebrate a “job well done.” And then, we happen upon the gold that answers all of our foodie desires. We discover Sel et Poivre, a gustatory journey to Europe, serving up a slice of Paris on Lexington Avenue.

REVIEW - TravelLady.com: “Sel et Poivre” is an unexpected bit of France in New York and it charms
A friend and I were walking on Lexington Avenue a few years ago and looking for a place for dinner. It wasn’t our neighborhood. But we saw an alluring spot and went in. It was Sel et Poivre (salt & pepper). It was charming and delicious. What a find! So, imagine my delight when I was invited to a press dinner there. I learned that this has been a popular neighborhood French restaurant for 25 years. Christian and Pamela Schienle bought it from her mother. And she had bought it from a Polish-American couple! And none of them were French! Except the chef for a while, but now, of course, the cook is Mexican, with a French accent, Christian declares. The menus are from Christian, who is executive chief and wine director. If you’re near Lex and 64th Street, this is a place to go. We had a tasting menu which I can recommend without hesitation...

REVIEW - Times Square Chronicals: Bonjour New York City – A Perfect French Meal Just Outside Your Door
New York City is an amazing place to live because of the great variety of international food found just outside our front doors. But, excellent French cuisine can still be hard to come across. There is, though, an amazing find found on the southern boarder of the Upper East Side called Sel et Poivre.

REVIEW - John Mariani and HuffingtonPost.com: Sel et Poivre Celebrates 25 Years in New York Without Ever Showing Its Age.

"Fashion," said French couturier Coco Chanel, "is made to go out of style," and as I read about the how insects are the hot new menu item or about a restaurant in Brooklyn where dinner is held in total silence, I wag my head and consider that the traditional French bistro has never been out of style, because, like work boots, they were never deliberately stylish in the first place.

The pleasures of a true French bistro have never waned for the most sensible reasons: bistros are neighborhood restaurants, built for sheer comfort. There will be good crusty bread and abundant butter on the table and a pot of flowers, along with a votive candle, re-lighted throughout the evening.

Bistro menus change their specials daily, but the basic menu is always pretty much the same in season, so that each dish has been perfected by long practice, day after day, night after night. So, even if one bistro's onion soup gratinée doesn't taste quite like another's, it will always taste the same in each.

What I have just described is exactly what you will find at Sel et Poivre...

REVIEW - DinnerReviews.com: Sel et Poivre.

When walking into Sel et Poivre on Manhattan’s upper east side, you are sure to be greeted warmly by co-owner, executive chef, and wine director Christian Schienle. If not Christian, then perhaps you’ll be greeted by his wife and co-owner Pamela or someone else on staff, decked out in a crisp white shirt and tie hurrying to pull out your chair. This is an intimate and inviting setting, complete with soft lights emitting from walls covered with black and white photos of the family’s history...

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REVIEW - NewbieFoodies.com: No Shades of Grey at Sel et Poivre.

Sel et Poivre was our first Press Dinner 3 years ago when we were a Newbie NewbieFoodies.com. It remained one of my all time favorites throughout the years. I rarely visit the Upper East Side, but when I do I make sure to stop by and check in. When I was contacted about doing another dinner I was thrilled to have a reason to force me over there and have yet another lovely meal...

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REVIEW - Little Dishcoveries: Sel et Poivre.

Back then, if you’d asked me about French cuisine, I wouldn’t have much insight to offer because I never received a proper introduction. And I’m pretty sure those cheesy escargots that my mother forced me to try five years ago don’t count. My first introduction to real French cooking was at Sel et Poivre several weeks ago when I was invited to blog about the bistro’s dinner menu. Helmed by Chef Christian Schienle, the quaint eatery started in 1989 on the busy strip of Lexington Avenue and it offers “a taste of Paris on Lex.” For those wondering, Sel et Poivre literally translates into Salt & Pepper — core ingredients in the cooking. Rustic and refined, the interior features honey-colored walls lined with black and white photographs and walnut paneling. Elegant flower-shaped lamps bathe the dining room in a warm yellow glow, creating the perfect ambiance for a nice dinner setting...

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REVIEW - FoodForOtt.com: Sel et Poivre - A French Feast On the Upper East.

For 25 years, Sel Et Poivre (French for Salt and Pepper) has brought traditional French cuisine to Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Husband and wife duo, Christian and Pamela Schienle have cultivated a loyal following. Even on a lukewarm Thursday evening, the bistro’s cozy dining space was packed with plenty of customers–families (some with kids, some with elderly relatives), couples, coworkers. Romantic mood lighting and candles, black and white family photographs, and even some classic sconces bring to mind an elegant Parisian villa. It’s a lovely shift from the hectic day-to-day business of Manhattan’s streets and the change is palpable as soon as you step inside the bistro’s doors on Lexington Avenue (between East 64th and 65th Streets)...

REVIEW - NY Food Journal: French Classics at Sel et Poivre.

It's not easy to find traditional french dishes in New York these days, so I was eager to try Sel et Poivre, a family-owned restaurant claiming to offer "a taste of Paris on Lex". A press dinner organized by the restaurant gave me that opportunity (portion size may vary from what is pictured here)...

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REVIEW - TheDailyMeal.com: Classic French Fare at New York's Sel et Poivre.

In New York, there are few restaurants that make the ten-year mark, let alone the twenty-year. Sel et Poivre (853 Lexington Ave) has been serving classic French bistro cuisine since 1989, and is still going strong in its renditions of traditional Parisian dishes. After opening the restaurant originally with her mom, Pamela Schienle and her husband Christian took over as the owners. Christian serves as the chef, wine director, and half-owner of the establishment, and acknowledges that the key to their happy husband-and-wife business is working on alternate days...

REVIEW - PinkPigNYC.com: Snails, Frog Legs, Vins Supérieurs: Sel Et Poivre.

No matter how many of New York's bijou traditional bistrots one eats at, one never seems to exhaust the supply. Lucien, Demarchelier, Chez Jacques, La Mangeoire--the list is still endless, the quality variable. It's pleasing--especially to someone who never tires of the cuisine bourgeois--to find the genre executed with skill and style, as it is at the 25 year veteran on Lex, Sel et Poivre...

REVIEW - TheEpochTimes.com: Unpretentious French, Frogs and All.

Scarcity is the mother of invention, non? French cuisine, at its heart, is about peasant food, from the old stewing hen going into the cooking pot, to frog legs. Using ingredients that were scrounged for during times of want is a time-honored tradition: frog legs, snails, offal—not much was ever off limits when you were hungry...




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REVIEW - TheRestaurantFairy.com: Sel et Poivre

I was recently invited to a press dinner at Sel et Poivre, a delightful little family-style French bistro on the Upper East Side. Executive chef and owner Christian Schienle, partnered with his wife Pamela, have created a place that truly encompasses the notion of a neighborhood spot. There is an open warmth emanating from everyone here. From the minute you walk in you get the feeling that home is not very far away...



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MARCH 2014 EVENT - Game Tasting Menu

Join us from Monday, March 10 through Sunday, March 23 for our delicious Game Tasting Menu!

REVIEW - Manhattanwithatwist.com: Escape the City at Sel et Poivre.

A sophisticated bistro on the Upper East Side has been pleasing customers for 25 years, welcoming guests into their candlelit and homey-feeling French restaurant. Sel et Poivre, a family-owned restaurant, is a quaint spot for a meal, with black and white photos, wooden tables and antique sconces adding to its classic feel...

REVIEW - IJustWantToEat.com: French dinner at Sel et Poivre on the Upper East Side.

When I received an invite for a press dinner at Sel et Poivre, a French bistro on the Upper East Side, I was very excited...and curious. Yes, curious because there are so many restaurants claiming to serve French cuisine in the City, when in fact their menu is at most inspired. Not that it is bad, but there are not that many places that serve classic French dishes besides the usual steak frites or the quiche Lorraine...


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REVIEW - Joonbug.com: The Upper East Side is home to a true gem of a restaurant.

No questions asked, the Upper East Side is definitely known for catering to a specific category of clientele. It’s nice, then, to know that some restaurants still exist in this area which can make you feel right at home, regardless of who you are or how much you’re spending...


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REVIEW - Examiner.com: Sel et Poivre - Romantic French dining on the Upper East Side

Walking into Sel et Poivre is like taking a warmly nostalgic step back in time, or a very quick transcontinental journey to Paris. Understated decor, soft candlelight, and a bistro-style layout give the Upper East Side restaurant an effortless sense of class. Sel et Poivre can hardly be called casual, but it just about manages to strike a balance between upscale elegance and warm accessibility that many Upper East Side eateries lack...

REVIEW - Cititour.com: Sel et Poivre

Paris hasn’t been the easiest place for New Yorkers to reach this snowy winter (much as we all want to get away). That may be why so many Upper East Siders chose the next best thing on a frigid Tuesday night: Sel et Poivre, the authentically Gallic bistro that has been a neighborhood staple for nearly 25 years. This intimate, comfortable space works just as well for a romantic dinner for two as it does for catching up with old friends...

REVIEW - YourVicariousExperience.com: Sel et Poivre

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of dining at Sel et Poivre a reasonably priced French bistro on the Upper East Side. On that particular Thursday, the restaurant was bustling. There were a number of people standing by the bar and they eventually dissipated, but many of them ended up staying for dinner. I was fortunate to be there for a press dinner so I was able to try several items from the Tasting Menu...


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REVIEW - The Epoch Times: Sel et Poivre

Sel et Poivre is a family-style French bistro. Since 1989, it has featured French-style comfort and hearty French dishes prepared by executive chef and owner Christian Schienle. His lovely and hospitable wife Pamela manages the front of the bistro. It is a place to escape into in a semi-casual and charming setting. Located in the Upper East Side, one of the busiest parts of New York City, Sel et Poivre makes a charming French-bistro addition to the neighborhood. Its intimate, cozy, and romantic dining room features candlelit wooden tables with white linen tablecloths, leather and fabric-upholstered banquettes, classic wood bistro chairs, antique sconces, black-and-white framed family photos of international travels alongside prints from renowned European photographers, and mood lighting. The bar at the front serves an eclectic selection of the best French and international wines...


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REVIEW - ChubbyChineseGirl.com: SEL et POIVRE - Where I fell in LOVE... with liver!

Last week I was invited to a Press Tasting Dinner at Sel et Poivre. A charming little French bistro on the upper east that's been around for over 20 years. Once a mother/daughter partnership, it's now a husband/wife joint. I've walked by countless times, but never stopped to smell the butter... so this was my perfect "eatpportunity"...


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REVIEW - NewbieFoodies.com: Don't pass on Sel et Poivre

We were invited to make our first non-museum journey to the Upper East Side to try Sel et Poivre's Tasting Menu. This delightful little bistro has been around for 22 years, so they are obviously doing something very right. It was originally run by a mother and daughter team, but when mom chose to retire, her son-in-law stepped in. It is now run by the husband and wife team of Christian & Pamela Schienle...


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FEBRUARY 2011 EVENT - Game Tasting Menu

Join us throughout this February for our delicious Game Tasting Menu!


REVIEW - John Mariani's Virtual Gourmet Newsletter

For New Year's let glamor and gaiety rule, but I seek the bustling comfort of a small restaurant, preferably one that's been around for a good long time. Thus, an old-fashioned, welcoming, traditional French bistro is where I want to go with friends, a place where the food is wonderful but the chef is not showing off, an atmosphere of warmth and good reception, and a place where I know whatever I order will taste as it always has...

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REVIEW - Oasis or Mirage

During my 5 days back in New York from college I have visited three restaurants alone just on Wednesday: Sel et Poivre, Le Souk and Pravda. I'll start off with Sel et Poivre. Sel et Poivre is a French bistro in the Upper East Side which has been around for 21 years. It has become a local favorite amongst people living in the area as it offers a very "homey" feel with good and authentic French food. The restaurant itself is cozy with dark wooden tables and dark leather banquettes. The front of the restaurant is great for lunch when the weather is warm and the restaurant keeps its windows open though I'd much prefer to sit in the back of the restaurant for dinner. The charm of the restaurant also comes from the humble and kind service that leaves the pretentiousness of other French Bistros in New York outside...

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REVIEW - FriendsEat.com: The Best Soup You’ve Never Had and More at Sel et Poivre

The menu at Sel et Poivre says “fish soup,” which is a little like calling truffles “mushrooms.” The surprising dish, like many at the family-run bistro on Lexington Avenue near 65th Street, is an introduction to classics you may have never tried, and a happy reunion with classics you haven’t had in years. Calves liver a la Lyonnais comes to mind. The fish soup is a wonder that you’ll want to bring your most unfazed foodie friends to try...


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REVIEW - WomanAroundTown.com: Sel et Poivre — Left Bank on the East Side

My favorite part of France is Provence, in part because of its wonderful food. Among my fondest memories is devouring a delicious fish soup in an unpretentious bistro on a warm spring day in Avignon. Unlike Bouillabaise, its more famous cousin, it is strained or pureed and accompanied by divine dollops of rouille (garlicky aioli with a peppery kick), thin slices of toasted French bread, and grated cheese. (I am a sucker for a good rouille, which I first discovered in Julia Child’s Mastering The Art of French Cooking, page 50.) So imagine my delight when I recently came upon that same, wonderful fish soup (rouille and all) in an unpretentious but charming East Side French bistro, Sel et Poivre, reasonably priced...


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REVIEW - TheGothamPalate.com: Paris on a plate: A Review of Sel et Poivre

Nestled among Upper East side retail boutiques and Lexington Avenue mid-scale eateries stands Sel et Poivre, a charming French bistro serving Classic French cuisine with contemporary flair. Established in 1989, by the dynamic and dedicated husband-wife team, Executive Chef/Owner Christian Schienle (originally from Austria) and welcoming hostess Pamela Schienle, Sel et Poivre is an elegant neighborhood bistro and a refreshing departure from the over-priced and pretentious, glamor-scenes in the Manhattan restaurant-scape...

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REVIEW - The Walman Report: Sel et Poivre

In our quest to review the newest and most trendy restaurant openings, let’s not forget New York’s heritage of charming family-run establishments. Whether they be American, ethnic or a charming French bistro such as Sel et Poivre, they are worth revisiting, remembering and add focus to a constantly changing restaurant scene, where the venue or clientele is often the main feature...

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REVIEW - BradleyHawks.com: An Affordable Touch of Paris on the Upper East Side

One couple clinks glasses of Cotes du Rhone, while another tears from a warm loaf of peasant bread, dipping it into the fragrant broth of the mussels al la provencal, both tables gazing upon Lexington Avenue over a lush partition of autumnal chrysanthemums. At the bar just beyond, neighborhood friends gather before moving to a table for an anecdotal evening of comradery...


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